Category Archives: Food

Ono, delicious, oishii, aroy – tasty tid bits from around the world. Topics include nutrition factoids, alternative perspectives on what constitutes a healthy diet, the food chain and farming, as well as personal experiences with exotic yummies.

Broke da Mouth Matcha Shake

No joke, brah.

Here be the super simple list of ingredients in perhaps my favorite shake of all time:

  • Soy milk (or, if you prefer, hemp, quinoa, almond, cashew, or some other nutty milk)
  • A few handfuls of spinach (mmhmm, I said spinach, baby)
  • ½ teaspoon (or more – vroom vroom!) of matcha, powdered green tea
  • Hemp seeds (or hemp protein powder)
  • Cashew butter (basically, just ground up raw cashews)
  • ¼ (ish) of a banana
  • ¼ (ish) of an avocado
  • Agave (or honey, maple syrup, etc. Click on the links to check out the mineral content and glycemic index for each natural sweetener. Note the agave numbers are for just 28g, while the honey and maple syrup figures are for over 300g.)
  • Vanilla or almond extract

If you’re a fan of creaminess and matcha (together, at long last!), this is a pretty killer combo, especially in the morning. The matcha is chock full of antioxidants and caffeine to get your day started off bright (sans the acidity and nervousness coffee can create), and there’s a whole lotta protein to kick start your metabolism, thanks to the soy, cashews, hemp, and avocado.

If you’re concerned about how fatty avocados and nuts are, rest assured, the kind of fats contained in these foods are your friends – they actually help to improve your cholesterol levels (and are much easier to digest than animal fats).

If you dig on sweet . . .

All ingredients at the end of the ingredients list in this shake of joy are really just a matter of taste. The suggested proportions should definitely be fiddled around with, and you might have some other sweetener, spice, or herb you could throw into the mix. I’m a big fan of caramely vanilla tones, so I tend to use almond, vanilla, agave, honey, and maple syrup on solid rotation. Maple syrup is the most nutritionally valuable sweetener, thanks to its manganese and zinc reserves, but the agave has an extremely low glycemic index. Honey’s biggest selling points are probably the anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties so effective in soothing respiratory and digestive discomfort. At the end of the day, I tend to choose a natural sweetener that tastes best for the brew!

Deja vu?

If you’re following the blog, you know I have a special place in my heart for matcha (and taro … mmm … taro…), and, technically, I’ve written about matcha shakes before. This week’s version, however, is new and improved, with lots of spinach and hemp to make it uber nutritious.

So here’s to honoring your body with the freshness and tasty love a divine temple deserves … kampai!

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Bubble Tea Madness!

If you’ve been reading my blog, you’ve probably noticed by now my obsession with all things green tea and taro.  On one glorious morning last week, my cousin and I happened across a new dessert spot near Ala Moana (Honolulu).  I ordered a taro milk tea with green tea bubbles.  The smiley man behind the counter at Bambu Desserts and Drinks did not disappoint.

This was, hands down, the best bubble tea I’ve ever had, and I grew up in Hawaii and lived in Asia as an adult for several years.  The people at Bambu don’t use sugary pre-made powders to make their taro bubble tea, oh no.  They actually boil taro root themselves and blend it into the tea for a healthier, richer experience.  If you’re in the ‘hood, I highly suggest checking it out!

And if you don’t happen to live in Honolulu, here’s an easy recipe for making bubble tea at home from TheKichn.com!

How to Make Boba and Bubble Tea

What You Need

Ingredients

1/4 cup dried boba tapioca pearls per serving (NOT quick-cooking boba)
1-2 tea bags per serving, any kind
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup sugar
Milk, almond milk, or sweetened condensed milk
Fruit juice or nectar (optional)

Equipment

Saucepan
Bowl for holding the cooked boba
Measuring cups

Instructions

1. Cook the Boba: Measure 2 cups of water for every 1/4 cup of boba being prepared into a saucepan. Bring the water to a boil over high heat. Add the boba and stir gently until they begin floating to the top of the water.

Turn the heat to medium and cook the boba for 12-15 minutes. Remove the pan from heat, cover, and let the pearls sit for another 12-15 minutes.

2. Prepare Sugar Syrup for the Boba: While the boba are cooking, make a simple sugar syrup to sweeten and preserve them once cooked. Bring 1/2 cup of water to a boil over high heat on the stove or in the microwave. Remove from heat and stir in 1/2 cup sugar until dissolved. Set aside to cool.

3. Prepare a Strong Cup of Tea: This can be done either while the boba are cooking or ahead of time. Allow enough time for the tea to cool completely before making the boba. Bring 1 cup of water to a boil. Remove from heat and add the tea bag. Use one tea bag for regular-strength bubble tea or two for a stronger tea flavor. Remove the tea bag after 15 minutes and chill the tea.

4. Finish the Boba: Once the boba have finished cooking, drain them from the water and transfer them to a small bowl or container. Pour the sugar syrup over top until the boba are submerged. Let sit until the boba are room temperature, at least 15 minutes, or refrigerate until ready to use. Boba are best if used within a few hours of cooking, but will keep refrigerated for several days. The boba will gradually harden and become crunchy as they sit.

5. Make the Bubble Tea: Pour the prepared tea into a tall glass and add the boba. Add milk for a creamy bubble tea, juice for a fruity tea, or leave plain and add a little extra water. Sweeten to taste with the simple syrup from soaking the boba.

Additional Notes:

Very Chilled Bubble Tea: For an extra-chilly bubble tea, combine all the tea, milk, and/or juice, but not the boba in a cocktail shaker. Add a few ice cubes and shake for 20 seconds. Pour into a tall glass and add the boba.

Shortcut Boba: If you want immediate gratification, just cook your boba until they are tender, 5 to 10 minutes, and use them as soon as they’re cool. This kind of boba don’t keep for very long (turning rock hard in a few hours), but are delicious if eaten right away.

Saving Leftover Boba and Making Boba for Later: Boba are best if used within a few hours of cooking, but will keep refrigerated with simple syrup for several days. The boba will gradually harden and become crunchy as they sit.

The Best Mangoes in the World

. . . are grown in Hawaii.  Seriously.  I’ve tried them in Thailand and India, from all over South America as well.  But the flavah involved in a Hawaiian mango is simply unparallelled.  No bias, I swear!

And these are just from one of the eight islands!
And these are just from one of the eight islands!

 

Tis the season for mango try something new?  The Food Network has oodles of ideas here.  Or you can try this tasty summer treat:

Seared Tuna with Mango Salsa Recipe

Ingredients

2 tablespoons good olive oil, plus extra for searing
1 1/2 cups diced yellow onion (2 onions)
2 teaspoons peeled, minced fresh ginger
1 1/2 teaspoons minced garlic
2 ripe mangos, peeled, seeded, and small diced
1/3 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
2 teaspoons light brown sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 to 2 teaspoons minced fresh jalapeno pepper, to taste (1 pepper)
2 teaspoons minced fresh mint leaves
2 tuna steaks

Directions

Saute the olive oil, onions, and ginger in a large saute pan over medium-low heat for 10 minutes, or until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the mangos, reduce the heat to low and cook for 10 more minutes. Add the orange juice, brown sugar, salt, black pepper, and jalapeno; cook for 10 more minutes, until orange juice is reduced, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat and add the mint. Serve warm, at room temperature, or chilled.

Heat a saute pan over high heat for 5 minutes until very hot. Season the tuna liberally with salt and pepper. When the pan is very hot, add a drizzle of olive oil and then the tuna steaks. Sear for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, or until the outside is browned, but the inside is very rare.

Serve the tuna on top of the mango salsa

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/seared-tuna-with-mango-salsa-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback

Banh Mi, Baby

Looking through some past blogs, Vietnamese food seems to pop up pretty often.  After being treated to some lovely Vietnamese at Greenwich Village’s Saigon Shack the other day, I had to post a recipe for one of my favorite dishes of all time: the Banh Mi sandwich.  Equal parts French and Vietnamese, this is a sandwich that promises to ignite your taste buds.  If you’ve never tried one before, it might sound a bit out there – but you never know until you try (and believe me, it’s worth it!).  You may even find yourself making your own unique version of banh mi at home.

banhmiinnovation

Banh Mi Recipe from Viet World Kitchen

For each sandwich:

1 petit baguette roll or a 7-inch section cut from a regular length baguette, purchased or homemade
Mayonnaise, real (whole egg) or homemade mayonnaise
Maggi Seasoning sauce or soy sauce
Your choice of boldly-flavored meat or tofu, sliced and at room temperature
3 or 4 thin seeded cucumber strips, pickling or English variety preferred
2 or 3 cilantro sprigs, roughly chopped
3 or 4 thin jalapeño pepper slices
Everyday Daikon and Carrot Pickle (do chua)

1. Slit the bread lengthwise, and then use your fingers or a bread knife to hollow out the insides, making a trough in both halves. Discard the insides or save it for another use, such as breadcrumbs. If necessary, crisp up the bread in a toaster oven preheated to 325ºF, and then let it cool for a minute before proceeding.

2. Generously spreading the inside with mayonnaise. Drizzle in some Maggi Seasoning sauce or soy sauce. Start from the bottom portion of bread to layer in the remaining ingredients. (As with all sandwiches, you’ll eventually develop an order for layering the filling so as to maximize the interaction between flavors and textures.) Close the sandwich, cut it in half crosswise for easy eating, and enjoy.

Related information:

Recipes:
Homemade Vietnamese baguette (banh mi)
Easy mayonnaise  (sot mayonnaise)
Daikon and Carrot Pickle (do chua)
Grilled lemongrass pork (thit heo nuong xa)
Meatball banh mi sandwich (banh mi xa xiu)
Quick Char Siu Pork
(on Asiandumplingtips.com, my other site)
Roasted Pork Belly sandwich (thit heo quay)
Check the recipe index for more filling ideas!

Posts on banh mi innovations
Banh mi incarnations from all over the world
Banh mi craze in New York City

Homemade Cous Cous

My arrival in Nice was marked by a mouthwatering cous cous, presented in a multitude of dishes.  Chickpeas, chilles, artichoke hearts, squash, bell peppers, tomatoes, chilli paste, raisins, fresh coriander, and of course, the cous cous itself.  Everything was served separately so we could choose just how much of everything to combine on our plates (one of us preferred to keep the cous cous separate from everything else, another mixed it all together). My hosts were clearly well-schooled on the ritual of damn fine cous cous creation; I’d never had anything like it!

If you’re into the background stories, here’s what Wikipedians have to say on cous cous history (scroll down for the recipe):

One of the first written references is from an anonymous 13th-century North Africa/Andalusian cookbook, Kitāb al-tabǐkh fǐ al-Maghrib (North Africa) wa’l-Andalus (Arabic) “The cookbook of the Maghreb and Al-Andalus“, with a recipe for couscous that was ‘known all over the world’. To this day, couscous is known as ‘the North Africa national dish’.[9] Couscous was known to the Nasrid royalty in Granada as well. And in the 13th century a Syrian historian from Aleppo includes four references for couscous. These early mentions show that couscous spread rapidly, but generally that couscous was common from Tripolitania to the west, while from Cyrenaica to the east the main cuisine was Egyptian, with couscous as an occasional dish. Today, in Egypt and the Middle East, couscous is known, but in Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia and Libya couscous is a staple. Couscous was taken from Syria to Turkey in the 16th century and is eaten in most of the southern provinces.

Couscous is a traditional meal of the cuisine from Trapani. In Rome Bartolomeo Scappi‘s culinary guide of 1570 describes a Moorish dish, succussu; in Tuscany.[10]

One of the earliest references to couscous in France is in Brittany, in a letter dated January 12, 1699. But it made an earlier appearance in Provence, where the traveler Jean Jacques Bouchard wrote of eating it in Toulon in 1630. Couscous was originally made from millet.[11] Historians have different opinions as to when wheat began to replace the use of millet. The conversion seems to have occurred sometime in the 20th century, although many regions continue to use the traditional millet. Couscous seems to have a North African origin. Archaeological evidence dating back to the 10th century, consisting of kitchen utensils needed to prepare this dish, has been found in this part of the world.

In some regions couscous is made from coarsely ground barley or pearl millet. In Brazil, the traditional couscous is made from cornmeal.[12]

This isn’t the precise menu used for my meal, but the recipe looks quite similar (and scrumptious!) .  Be warned: it’s a multi-step process and takes a considerable amount of time:

***

This is my mother-in-law’s outstanding recipe for classic Moroccan Couscous with Seven Vegetables. Steamed couscous is piled high with stewed meat and vegetables – very delicious! Omit the meat for a vegetarian couscous.

See How to Steam Couscous if you’ve never used a couscoussier. If cooking chicken, an organic, free-range bird works best due to the long cooking time.

Vary the vegetables to your family’s preferences, but try to include the full variety to achieve an authentically flavored sauce. Popular additions are listed as optional ingredients.

Buttermilk or Saycouk are traditionally offered afterward.

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 2 hours

Total Time: 2 hours, 30 minutes

Yield: Generously serves 6 adults

Ingredients:

  • 1 kg (2 lbs. 3 oz.) dry couscous (not instant)
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • ——————————————————————
  • 1 kg (2 lbs. 3 oz.) lamb or beef, cut into large pieces on the bone (or 1 whole chicken)
  • 1 large onion, coarsely chopped
  • 3 tomatoes, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons salt
  • 1 tablespoon pepper
  • 2 teaspoons ginger
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric, or 1/4 teaspoon Moroccan yellow colorant
  • 1 handful of parsley and cilantro sprigs, tied into a bouquet
  • ——————————————————————
  • 1/2 of a small cabbage, cut into 2 or 3 sections
  • 3 or 4 turnips, peeled and halved
  • 10 carrots, peeled and halved
  • 1 or 2 tomatoes, peeled and quartered
  • 1 or 2 small onions, whole or halved
  • 1 small acorn squash, quartered (or a small section of pumpkin, cut into 3″ pieces)
  • 4 or 5 small zucchini (long or 8-ball round), ends removed and halved
  • 2 or 3 small sweet potatoes, peeled and halved (optional)
  • 1/4 cup dry chickpeas, soaked overnight (optional)
  • 1/2 cup fresh fava beans (optional)
  • 1 or 2 jalapeño or chili peppers (optional)*
  • ——————————————————————
  • 2 tablespoons butter (for the couscous)
  • 1 tablespoon salt (for the couscous)
  • 1 teaspoon smen (Moroccan preserved butter – optional)

Preparation:

Note: A free range chicken (djaj beldi) will require the same cooking time and procedure as indicated below for beef or lamb. If using a regular factory-raised chicken, remove it from the pot when fully cooked and set aside. Return it to the pot to reheat for a few minutes just prior to serving.

Mix the meat, onion, tomatoes, oil and spices in the bottom of a couscoussier. Cook uncovered over medium to medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, for about 15 minutes, or until the meat is browned and the onions and tomatoes have formed a thick sauce.

Add 2 1/2 liters (about 2 1/2 quarts) of water, the parsley/cilantro bouquet, and the chick peas. Cover, and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium, and simmer rapidly for 25 to 30 minutes. (Note: If omitting both meat and chick peas, there’s no need to simmer for awhile before proceeding to the next step.)

First Steaming of the Couscous

See the photo tutorial How to Steam Couscous if you’ve never used a couscoussier before.

While the meat is cooking, get the couscous ready for its first steaming. Oil the steamer basket and set it aside. Empty the dry couscous into a very large bowl, and work in 1/4 cup of vegetable oil with your hands, tossing the couscous and rubbing it between your palms. (This will help prevent the couscous grains from clumping together.) Next, work in 1 cup of water in the same manner, using your hands to evenly distribute the liquid into the couscous. Transfer the couscous to the oiled steamer basket.

Add the cabbage to the broth, and place the steamer basket on top. Once you see steam rising from the couscous, steam the couscous for 15 minutes.

Note: If you see steam escaping from between the basket and couscoussier, you’ll need to seal the joint. You can do this in several ways:

  • wrap and tie a long piece of damp cloth over the joint, or
  • tightly wrap a long piece of kitchen plastic film around the joint, or
  • wrap and drape a long piece of kitchen plastic film onto the rim of the couscoussier, and then place the basket on top (this is my preferred method)

Once the couscous has steamed for 15 minutes, empty it back into your large bowl and break it apart.

Second Steaming of the Couscous

When the couscous has cooled enough to handle, gradually work in 2 cups of water and 1 tablespoon of salt with your hands. Again, toss the couscous and rub it between your palms to break up any balls or clumps. Transfer the couscous back into the steamer, taking care not to pack or compress the couscous.

Add the turnips, tomatoes, onions, carrots and fava beans (if using) to the pot. Place the steamer basket on top of the couscoussier, and steam the couscous a second time for 15 minutes, timing from when you see the steam rising from the couscous. (Again, seal the joint if you see steam escaping.)

When the couscous has steamed for 15 to 20 minutes, turn it out into the large bowl again. Break it apart, and leave to cool a few minutes.

If using pumpkin, add it to the couscoussier, and cover the pot.

Third Steaming of Couscous

Gradually work 3 cups of water into the couscous with your hands, tossing it and rubbing the grains between your palms. Taste the couscous, and add a little salt if desired.

Transfer about half of the couscous to the steamer basket. Again, try to handle the couscous lightly and avoid packing it into the steamer.

Add the squash, zucchini, and sweet potatoes to the couscoussier, and place the steamer basket on top. (Again, seal the joint if necessary.)

When you see the steam rise through the couscous, carefully add the remaining couscous to the steamer. Continue cooking, watching for the steam to rise from the couscous. Allow the couscous to steam a third time for a full 15 to 20 minutes. At this point, all of the vegetables should be cooked. Test the vegetables to be sure, cooking longer if necessary. Taste the broth – it should be salty and peppery – and adjust the seasoning if desired.

If you’re using smen, add it to the sauce in the pot.

Serving the Couscous and Vegetables

Empty the couscous into the large bowl, and break it apart. Mix in the 2 tablespoons of butter with 2 ladles of broth.

To serve the couscous, shape it into a mound with a well in the center. Put the meat into the well, and arrange the vegetables on top and all around. Distribute the broth evenly over the couscous and vegetables, reserving one or two bowlfuls to offer on the side for those who prefer more.

* If you’re serving the couscous with jalapeño peppers, simmer the peppers, covered, in a half-ladle of broth and a little water, for about 40 minutes, or until the jalapeños are tender. The peppers are typically placed on top of the couscous, and small pieces may be broken off as a condiment.

Heartfelt Prezzies (& Summer Sangria Recipe)

IMG_20130605_221014

The last few days I’ve been showered with the sweetest presents from friends (I think I should be “about to leave New York” more often!  Though it is sad to be going, it also means I’ve been spending a lot more time with the people I hold dear to me ;)).

Yesterday one of my oldest friends made the trek out to Brooklyn and provided a most delicioso addition to our little dinner party: Summer Sangria (recipe below).

Then today, a dear yoga sister gave me this handmade necklace of quartz and rudraksha, on the left.  It’s almost as stunning as the woman who made it!

Big shining heart thanks – more for the friends than for the presents of course, but I’ve already blogged about awesome friends 🙂

Summer Sangria Recipe, courtesy Tamara Acoba

1 bottle of red wine

.5 liter of ginger ale

  • A handful of blueberries
  • A few handfuls of strawberries, quartered
  • 1 kiwi, peeled and cut into small pieces
  • Ice
  • (optional: raspberries, peaches, lemon)
  • Mix and let sit for twenty minutes before serving and, voila!  You have yourself a most thirst quenching summer bevvie.

Not sure if red wine is good for you?  Check out what the Mayo Clinic has to say on the matter:

Red wine and resveratrol: Good for your heart?

Red wine and something in red wine called resveratrol might be heart healthy. Find out the facts, and hype, regarding red wine and its impact on your heart.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Red wine, in moderation, has long been thought of as heart healthy. The alcohol and certain substances in red wine called antioxidants may help prevent heart disease by increasing levels of “good” cholesterol and protecting against artery damage.

While the news about red wine might sound great if you enjoy a glass of red wine with your evening meal, doctors are wary of encouraging anyone to start drinking alcohol. That’s because too much alcohol can have many harmful effects on your body.

Still, many doctors agree that something in red wine appears to help your heart. It’s possible that antioxidants, such as flavonoids or a substance called resveratrol, have heart-healthy benefits.

How is red wine heart healthy?

Red wine seems to have even more heart-healthy benefits than other types of alcohol, but it’s possible that red wine isn’t any better than beer, white wine or liquor for heart health. There’s still no clear evidence that red wine is better than other forms of alcohol when it comes to possible heart-healthy benefits.

Antioxidants in red wine called polyphenols may help protect the lining of blood vessels in your heart. A polyphenol called resveratrol is one substance in red wine that’s gotten attention.

Resveratrol in red wine

Resveratrol might be a key ingredient in red wine that helps prevent damage to blood vessels, reduces “bad” cholesterol and prevents blood clots.

Most research on resveratrol has been done on animals, not people. Research in mice given resveratrol suggests that the antioxidant might also help protect them from obesity and diabetes, both of which are strong risk factors for heart disease. However, those findings were reported only in mice, not in people. In addition, to get the same dose of resveratrol used in the mice studies, a person would have to drink over 60 liters of red wine every day.

Some research shows that resveratrol could be linked to a reduced risk of inflammation and blood clotting, both of which can lead to heart disease. More research is needed before it’s known whether resveratrol was the cause for the reduced risk.

Resveratrol in grapes, supplements and other foods

The resveratrol in red wine comes from the skin of grapes used to make wine. Because red wine is fermented with grape skins longer than is white wine, red wine contains more resveratrol. Simply eating grapes, or drinking grape juice, has been suggested as one way to get resveratrol without drinking alcohol. Red and purple grape juices may have some of the same heart-healthy benefits of red wine.

Other foods that contain some resveratrol include peanuts, blueberries and cranberries. It’s not yet known how beneficial eating grapes or other foods might be compared with drinking red wine when it comes to promoting heart health. The amount of resveratrol in food and red wine can vary widely.

Resveratrol supplements are also available. While researchers haven’t found any harm in taking resveratrol supplements, most of the resveratrol in the supplements can’t be absorbed by your body.

How does alcohol help the heart?

Various studies have shown that moderate amounts of all types of alcohol benefit your heart, not just alcohol found in red wine. It’s thought that alcohol:

  • Raises high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, the “good” cholesterol
  • Reduces the formation of blood clots
  • Helps prevent artery damage caused by high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, the “bad” cholesterol

Drink in moderation — or not at all

Red wine’s potential heart-healthy benefits look promising. Those who drink moderate amounts of alcohol, including red wine, seem to have a lower risk of heart disease. However, more research is needed before we know whether red wine is better for your heart than are other forms of alcohol, such as beer or spirits.

Neither the American Heart Association nor the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommend that you start drinking alcohol just to prevent heart disease. Alcohol can be addictive and can cause or worsen other health problems.

Drinking too much increases your risk of high blood pressure, high triglycerides, liver damage, obesity, certain types of cancer, accidents and other problems. In addition, drinking too much alcohol regularly can cause cardiomyopathy — weakened heart muscle — causing symptoms of heart failure in some people. If you have heart failure or a weak heart, you should avoid alcohol completely. If you take aspirin daily, you should avoid or limit alcohol, depending on your doctor’s advice. You also shouldn’t drink alcohol if you’re pregnant. If you have questions about the benefits and risks of alcohol, talk to your doctor about specific recommendations for you.

If you already drink red wine, do so in moderation. Moderate drinking is defined as an average of two drinks a day for men and one drink a day for women. The limit for men is higher because men generally weigh more and have more of an enzyme that metabolizes alcohol than women do.

A drink is defined as 12 ounces (355 milliliters, or mL) of beer, 5 ounces (148 mL) of wine or 1.5 ounces (44 mL) of 80-proof distilled spirits.

Creamy Truffle Sauce of the Gods

I just had one of the best thin crust pizzas of my life at Numero 28 in the East Village – perfectly crusty bottom, a warm soft center, loads of mushrooms, speck, and the key ingredient: a decadent creamy truffle sauce. You might just want to bathe in it, it’s just that good.

Gonna have to take a few moments to appreciate what they’ve done there.  In the meantime, if you’re feeling inspired, here’s a Truffle Cream Sauce recipe from the Food Network….

Ingredients
5 egg yolks, at room temperature
4 cups canola oil
Juice of 1 1/2 lemons
2 ounces truffle oil
1 1/4 tablespoons salt
1/2 tablespoon pepper
French fries, for serving
Grated Parmesan, for serving
Directions
Whisk the eggs yolks with 1 teaspoon water in a mixing bowl. Slowly whisk the canola oil into the eggs until an emulsion forms. Slowly add 1/2 cup lukewarm water and the lemon juice when the emulsion becomes too thick.

Make sure the sauce is creamy and fully emulsified before adding the truffle oil. Whisk in the truffle oil and add the salt and pepper. Add more water until the sauce turns off-white in color and has the consistency of ketchup. Taste for seasoning and acid, and add salt and lemon juice accordingly.

Serve on top of fresh, hot French fries tossed with a little salt and pepper, and sprinkle with grated Parmesan.

Cook’s Note: All the ingredients should be at room temperature to prevent the sauce from breaking. The sauce should be creamy and not too runny.

Food Network Kitchens suggest caution in consuming raw and lightly-cooked eggs due to the risk of Salmonella or other food-borne illness. To reduce this risk, we recommend you use only fresh, properly-refrigerated, clean, grade A or AA eggs with intact shells, and avoid contact between the yolks or whites and the shell. For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served use shell eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method.

This recipe was provided by a chef, restaurant or culinary professional and makes a large quantity. The Food Network Kitchens chefs have not tested this recipe, in the proportions indicated, and therefore, we cannot make any representation as to the results.

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/truffle-cream-sauce-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback